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  • Career advice for millennials (and really, anyone) from Margaret Heffernan

    TED Blog
    Kate Torgovnick May
    3 Jul 2015 | 12:00 pm
    In her career, Margaret Heffernan has been the CEO of five businesses. What advice does she have for people just starting their careers? First: Get to know your coworkers. Photo: Paul Clarke/TED It’s a month after graduation, which means the luckiest new college grads are a month deep into internships and entry-level jobs. How to stand out? Business writer Margaret Heffernan suggests: Start by taking a coffee break with your coworkers. Companies grow best, she suggests, when workers are connected by social bonds. Heffernan’s TED Book, Beyond Measure: The Big Impact of Small Changes,…
  • Rajiv Maheswaran: The math behind basketball's wildest moves

    Video
    6 Jul 2015 | 8:16 am
    Basketball is a fast-moving game of improvisation, contact and, ahem, spatio-temporal pattern recognition. Rajiv Maheswaran and his colleagues are analyzing the movements behind the key plays of the game, to help coaches and players combine intuition with new data. Bonus: What they're learning could help us understand how humans move everywhere.
  • Rajiv Maheswaran: The math behind basketball's wildest moves

    High Definition
    6 Jul 2015 | 8:16 am
    Basketball is a fast-moving game of improvisation, contact and, ahem, spatio-temporal pattern recognition. Rajiv Maheswaran and his colleagues are analyzing the movements behind the key plays of the game, to help coaches and players combine intuition with new data. Bonus: What they're learning could help us understand how humans move everywhere.
  • Latif Nasser: The amazing story of the man who gave us modern pain relief

    Podcasts
    1 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    For the longest time, doctors basically ignored the most basic and frustrating part of being sick -- pain. In this lyrical, informative talk, Latif Nasser tells the extraordinary story of wrestler and doctor John J. Bonica, who persuaded the medical profession to take pain seriously -- and transformed the lives of millions.
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    TED Blog

  • Career advice for millennials (and really, anyone) from Margaret Heffernan

    Kate Torgovnick May
    3 Jul 2015 | 12:00 pm
    In her career, Margaret Heffernan has been the CEO of five businesses. What advice does she have for people just starting their careers? First: Get to know your coworkers. Photo: Paul Clarke/TED It’s a month after graduation, which means the luckiest new college grads are a month deep into internships and entry-level jobs. How to stand out? Business writer Margaret Heffernan suggests: Start by taking a coffee break with your coworkers. Companies grow best, she suggests, when workers are connected by social bonds. Heffernan’s TED Book, Beyond Measure: The Big Impact of Small Changes,…
  • How do teens think about body image, beauty and bullying? 3 perspectives from around the world

    Stephanie Lo
    2 Jul 2015 | 7:34 am
    Body image, beauty and bullying. In TED-Ed Clubs, students are guided through the process of making a presentation on an idea they feel passionate about — and dozens of students in clubs around the world have boldly chosen to talk about how to combat negative body image, distorted images of beauty and the bullying that springs from rigid rules about appearance. Watch — but more important, listen — to these three inspiring perspectives on body image, beauty and bullying from teenagers in three different countries.   A presentation on body image: A competition with yourself Julia…
  • The legacy of slavery echoed in the Charleston shooting, why we feel awe, the happy memories of mice + more

    Cynthia Betubiza
    1 Jul 2015 | 12:41 pm
    The TED community has been very busy over the past few weeks. Below, some newsy highlights. Powerful thoughts on slavery’s legacy. Last week, Bryan Stevenson spoke with The Marshall Project about the shooting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina. In a Q&A, Stevenson shared his thoughts on the deeply entrenched legacy of slavery. “I don’t believe slavery ended in 1865, I believe it just evolved,” he said. “It turned into decades of racial hierarchy that was violently enforced — from the end of reconstruction until WWII — through acts of…
  • TED@BCG focuses on the many meanings of growth

    Kate Torgovnick May
    1 Jul 2015 | 6:41 am
    Douglas Beal kicked off TED@BCG with a look at how growth in terms of GDP doesn’t always align with growth in terms of citizen well-being. Photo: Paul Clarke/TED Growth is usually a good thing. For a person, it means more wisdom; for a business, it means more profit; for a country, it means increased prosperity. But growth has a darker side too: aging, a sense of impersonality, waste and pollution. At TED@BCG — the latest TED Institute event, held on June 30, 2015, at Old Billingsgate Market in London — speakers explored both edges of this term. In three sessions of talks, curated…
  • QUIZ: Which TED Talk are you?

    Nadia Goodman
    30 Jun 2015 | 12:59 pm
    A fun way to find a talk that’s just right for you…
 
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    Video

  • Rajiv Maheswaran: The math behind basketball's wildest moves

    6 Jul 2015 | 8:16 am
    Basketball is a fast-moving game of improvisation, contact and, ahem, spatio-temporal pattern recognition. Rajiv Maheswaran and his colleagues are analyzing the movements behind the key plays of the game, to help coaches and players combine intuition with new data. Bonus: What they're learning could help us understand how humans move everywhere.
  • Gayle Tzemach Lemmon: Meet the women fighting on the front lines of an American war

    2 Jul 2015 | 8:01 am
    In 2011, the US Armed Forces still had a ban on women in combat -- but in that year, a Special Operations team of women was sent to Afghanistan to serve on the front lines, to build rapport with locals and try to help bring an end to the war. Reporter Gayle Tzemach Lemmon tells the story of this "band of sisters," an extraordinary group of women warriors who helped break a long-standing barrier to serve.
  • Latif Nasser: The amazing story of the man who gave us modern pain relief

    1 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    For the longest time, doctors basically ignored the most basic and frustrating part of being sick -- pain. In this lyrical, informative talk, Latif Nasser tells the extraordinary story of wrestler and doctor John J. Bonica, who persuaded the medical profession to take pain seriously -- and transformed the lives of millions.
  • Jimmy Carter: Why I believe the mistreatment of women is the number one human rights abuse 

    30 Jun 2015 | 8:01 am
    With his signature resolve, former US President Jimmy Carter dives into three unexpected reasons why the mistreatment of women and girls continues in so many manifestations in so many parts of the world, both developed and developing. The final reason he gives? “In general, men don’t give a damn.”
  • Dame Ellen MacArthur: The surprising thing I learned sailing solo around the world

    29 Jun 2015 | 8:19 am
    What do you learn when you sail around the world on your own? When solo sailor Ellen MacArthur circled the globe – carrying everything she needed with her – she came back with new insight into the way the world works, as a place of interlocking cycles and finite resources, where the decisions we make today affect what's left for tomorrow. She proposes a bold new way to see the world's economic systems: not as linear, but as circular, where everything comes around.
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    High Definition

  • Rajiv Maheswaran: The math behind basketball's wildest moves

    6 Jul 2015 | 8:16 am
    Basketball is a fast-moving game of improvisation, contact and, ahem, spatio-temporal pattern recognition. Rajiv Maheswaran and his colleagues are analyzing the movements behind the key plays of the game, to help coaches and players combine intuition with new data. Bonus: What they're learning could help us understand how humans move everywhere.
  • Gayle Tzemach Lemmon: Meet the women fighting on the front lines of an American war

    2 Jul 2015 | 8:01 am
    In 2011, the US Armed Forces still had a ban on women in combat -- but in that year, a Special Operations team of women was sent to Afghanistan to serve on the front lines, to build rapport with locals and try to help bring an end to the war. Reporter Gayle Tzemach Lemmon tells the story of this "band of sisters," an extraordinary group of women warriors who helped break a long-standing barrier to serve.
  • Latif Nasser: The amazing story of the man who gave us modern pain relief

    1 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    For the longest time, doctors basically ignored the most basic and frustrating part of being sick -- pain. In this lyrical, informative talk, Latif Nasser tells the extraordinary story of wrestler and doctor John J. Bonica, who persuaded the medical profession to take pain seriously -- and transformed the lives of millions.
  • Jimmy Carter: Why I believe the mistreatment of women is the number one human rights abuse 

    30 Jun 2015 | 8:01 am
    With his signature resolve, former US President Jimmy Carter dives into three unexpected reasons why the mistreatment of women and girls continues in so many manifestations in so many parts of the world, both developed and developing. The final reason he gives? “In general, men don’t give a damn.”
  • Dame Ellen MacArthur: The surprising thing I learned sailing solo around the world

    29 Jun 2015 | 8:19 am
    What do you learn when you sail around the world on your own? When solo sailor Ellen MacArthur circled the globe – carrying everything she needed with her – she came back with new insight into the way the world works, as a place of interlocking cycles and finite resources, where the decisions we make today affect what's left for tomorrow. She proposes a bold new way to see the world's economic systems: not as linear, but as circular, where everything comes around.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Podcasts

  • Latif Nasser: The amazing story of the man who gave us modern pain relief

    1 Jul 2015 | 8:00 am
    For the longest time, doctors basically ignored the most basic and frustrating part of being sick -- pain. In this lyrical, informative talk, Latif Nasser tells the extraordinary story of wrestler and doctor John J. Bonica, who persuaded the medical profession to take pain seriously -- and transformed the lives of millions.
  • Chip Kidd: The art of first impressions -- in design and life

    23 Jun 2015 | 7:59 am
    Book designer Chip Kidd knows all too well how often we judge things by first appearances. In this hilarious, fast-paced talk, he explains the two techniques designers use to communicate instantly -- clarity and mystery -- and when, why and how they work. He celebrates beautiful, useful pieces of design, skewers less successful work, and shares the thinking behind some of his own iconic book covers.
  • Roxane Gay: Confessions of a bad feminist

    22 Jun 2015 | 8:22 am
    When writer Roxane Gay dubbed herself a "bad feminist," she was making a joke, acknowledging that she couldn't possibly live up to the demands for perfection of the feminist movement. But she's realized that the joke rang hollow. In a thoughtful and provocative talk, she asks us to embrace all flavors of feminism -- and make the small choices that, en masse, might lead to actual change.
  • LaToya Ruby Frazier: A visual history of inequality in industrial America

    18 Jun 2015 | 7:54 am
    For the last 12 years, LaToya Ruby Frazier has photographed friends, neighbors and family in Braddock, Pennsylvania. But though the steel town has lately been hailed as a posterchild of "rustbelt revitalization," Frazier's pictures tell a different story, of the real impact of inequality and environmental toxicity. In this short, powerful talk, the TED Fellow shares a deeply personal glimpse of an often-unseen world.
  • Steve Silberman: The forgotten history of autism

    17 Jun 2015 | 7:59 am
    Decades ago, few pediatricians had heard of autism. In 1975, 1 in 5,000 kids was estimated to have it. Today, 1 in 68 is on the autism spectrum. What caused this steep rise? Steve Silberman points to “a perfect storm of autism awareness” — a pair of psychologists with an accepting view, an unexpected pop culture moment and a new clinical test. But to really understand, we have to go back further to an Austrian doctor by the name of Hans Asperger, who published a pioneering paper in 1944. Because it was buried in time, autism has been shrouded in misunderstanding ever since. (This talk…
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